Looking at 1000 Google Maps Hospitality Industry Reviews

Greetings from inside the SEOigloo!

This is just a quick pointer over to my Search Engine Guide article about Review Sites for the Hospitality Industry. I spent a couple of hours combing 1000 reviews listed in Google Maps for B&Bs, Hotels, Restaurants, etc. and made a list of all of the great sources from which Google is pulling its reviews.

If you’re a hospitality industry business owner, why not bookmark my list as part of your plans for increasing your reviews this year? Or, if you’re an SEO/Internet Marketer, the list may help you better serve your clients.

I hope you’ll enjoy it. I know I’m really enjoying writing for Search Engine Guide!

2 Responses to “Looking at 1000 Google Maps Hospitality Industry Reviews”

  1. on 29 Jan 2008 at 6:12 pm wasinthebiz

    Miriam,

    Very interesting to know where these reviews are coming from and how it works. I’ve always wondered what else besides TripAdvisor is used for reviews.

    Having been in the hospitality business some years ago, I can tell you it would be chilling to get a bad review. Thank goodness I never had one. I would ask my guests to review me on TripAdvisor (I was confident). It does keep one on one’s toes if you know you are going to be reviewed and it will be seen all over the web. Once it’s out there, it cannot be retrieved.
    Cheers

  2. on 29 Jan 2008 at 6:46 pm admin

    Donna, your insights on this subject are so valuable, because of your experience in this industry.

    Yes, the permanence of reviews is daunting, I agree. For me, the biggest chaos factor in this is that hospitality-related businesses have no say in whom they serve. If you serve an unreasonable guest with outlandish expectations, they can write a terrible and unjust review of your business.

    I try to be careful in writing reviews of hotels/restaurants. I tell it like it is, but even in reviews expressing dissatisfaction, I try to look for something good to say, or make a suggestion for improvement.

    For example, my husband and I stayed at a lodge a year or two ago that had very nice grounds and the potential for nice dwellings, but the rooms were completely unsanitary. Gross, to be blunt. In my review, I stated both what was good about the room and bad about it. The challenge is to not let anger over a bad experience lead to an angry, raging review. Rather, an honest account of your experience is what is required.

    And, as I mentioned in the SEG article, my hope is that reviews will lead to greater accountability for business owners. It really is crummy to have a vacation ruined by yucky lodgings. But, when a B&B owner is someone like you, Donna, who obviously has abundant care for the niceties of respecting people’s comfort, I think the chances of getting mostly good reviews are very high. Still, there’s no denying a cranky guest can do some damage.

    My question for you is, how does this relate to the types of traditional media B&B owners were previously accustomed to. How does UGC compare to the professional reviews given in guidebooks? I’d like to hear your thoughts on this.

    Thank you so much for stopping by. It’s such a pleasure to have you here, Donna!
    Miriam

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